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Left And Right Politics

…plus the cream in the center.

Lose Custody Of Your Obese Child?

Posted by Billy On July - 14 - 2011

This week the Journal of the American Medical Association released an opinion piece in regards to the issue of obese children. Their stance was that putting these children in foster care would be more ethical than obesity surgery. The author of this piece is joining forces with advocates who claim that the government should be allowed to intervene in extreme cases. So, should parents lose custody of the extremely obese child?

Dr. David Ludwig, an obesity specialist at Harvard-affiliated Children’s Hospital Boston, feels it isn’t the point to blame the parents, but to act in the child’s best interest to get them the help they need for whatever reason the parent can’t provided. I don’t know about many parents feel about this but in my opinion, this would be a clear case of government overreaching their authority.

Ludwig is quoted, “State intervention ideally will support not just the child but the whole family, with the goal of reuniting child and family as soon as possible. That may require instruction on parenting,” Ludwig, along with Lindsey Murtugh who is a lawyer at Harvard’s School of Public Health, wrote this article. “Despite the discomfort posed by state intervention, it may sometimes be necessary to protect a child,” Murtagh said.

While I feel that this is a problem in the United States and is the responsibility of the parents to provide healthy choices for their children, others like bioethicist Art Caplin feel it can be blame on other factors as well. He states, “obese children are victims of advertising, marketing, peer pressure and bullying _ things a parent can’t control.” Caplin continues “If you’re going to change a child’s weight, you’re going to have to change all of them,” Caplan said.
I can see his statement in regards to advertising and marketing, but peer pressure and bullying?

This has gotten out of hand with people who feel that the government needs to be involved in issues that they have no authority to be in. Where does it end? By what “standard” are they going to gauge a child being obese?
What has happened to this country where we remove ourselves from responsibility? Over the last few years, the federal government has been expanding their authority and if this is the next thing where they (government) are to get involved in, where does it stop?

Yes, these days families either have both parents working or consist of a single parent. Being with our children have become less and less as parents struggle to keep their financial lives in order. There are those though that just don’t care what their kids eat, but does that now make it the responsibility of the state? As it is, the government can’t even take care of the issues they are required to handle and now let’s throw in raising obese children. Ultimately this is a personal issue and that’s it. If it falls into child endangerment, child abuse or neglect, that one thing, but this crossing the line.

There are currently nearly two million children in the United States who considered extremely obese. As it is, the foster care system has trouble finding foster homes for the kids that need it. How would the system improve with adding obese children into the mix?

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A Libertarian’s New Year’s Resolutions

Posted by Joanne On December - 31 - 2009

I received the following in my inbox from Advocates For Self-Government and wanted to pass it along.

Have you made your New Year’s Resolutions? Several years ago, Harry Browne — 1996 and 2000 Libertarian Party presidential candidate, world-renowned libertarian speaker and writer, and very good friend of the Advocates — made his. The result was a compact how-to of effective libertarian communication, by one of history’s most persuasive advocates of the ideas of liberty. I would like to once again share these resolutions with you. If you’re like me, you’ll find them inspiring and uplifting. I hope you will add them to your own resolutions — and share them with other libertarians.

A Libertarian’s New Year’s Resolutions
by Harry Browne

1. I resolve to sell liberty by appealing to the self-interest of each prospect, rather than preaching to people and expecting them to suddenly adopt my ideas of right and wrong.

2. I resolve to keep from being drawn into arguments or debates. My purpose is to inspire people to want liberty — not to prove that they’re wrong.

3. I resolve to listen when people tell me of their wants and needs, so I can help them see how a free society will satisfy those needs.

4. I resolve to identify myself, when appropriate, with the social goals someone may seek — a cleaner environment, more help for the poor, a less divisive society — and try to show him that those goals can never be achieved by government, but will be well served in a free society.

5. I resolve to be compassionate and respectful of the beliefs and needs that lead people to seek government help. I don’t have to approve of their subsidies or policies — but if I don’t acknowledge their needs, I have no hope of helping them find a better way to solve their problem.

6. No matter what the issue, I resolve to keep returning to the central point: how much better off the individual will be in a free society.

7. I resolve to acknowledge my good fortune in having been born an American. Any plan for improvement must begin with a recognition of the good things we have. To speak only of America’s defects will make me a tiresome crank.

8. I resolve to focus on the ways America could be so much better with a very small government — not to dwell on all the wrongs that exist today.

9. I resolve to cleanse myself of hate, resentment, and bitterness. Such things steal time and attention from the work that must be done.

10. I resolve to speak, dress, and act in a respectable manner. I may be the first libertarian someone has encountered, and it’s important that he get a good first impression. No one will hear the message if the messenger is unattractive.

11. I resolve to remind myself that someone’s “stupid” opinion may be an opinion I once held. If Ican grow, why can’t I help himgrow?

12. I resolve not to raise my voice in any discussion. In a shouting match, no one wins, no one changes his mind, and no one will be inspired to join our quest for a free society.

13. I resolve not to adopt the tactics of Republicans and Democrats. They use character assassination, evasions, and intimidation because they have no real benefits to offer Americans. We, on the other hand, are offering to set people free — and so we can win simply by focusing on the better life our proposals will bring.

14. I resolve to be civil to my opponents and treat them with respect. However anyone chooses to treat me, it’s important that I be a better person than my enemies.

Harry passed away in March of 2006. If enough of us follow Harry’s advice, we can make 2010 the best year yet for the libertarian movement. There could be no greater tribute to Harry — and no greater gift to America! Happy New Year to all our friends, readers and visitors. :)

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Some Links Of Interest

Posted by Joanne On September - 15 - 2009

I come across good, and not so good, sites in my daily internet travels and I wanted to share some of the ones I’ve enjoyed. Hopefully you’ll find a few you enjoy as well.

The Liberator is a free newsletter from the Libertarian site, Advocates for Self-Government. The latest issue has an article on health care being called a ‘right”.

The right questions to ask about medical care and medical insurance:

* Which laws, regulations, or government mandates drive up the costs of medical care, medicine, and medical insurance?

* Which of these laws, regulations, and government mandates can your state legislature and governor repeal? Which need to be repealed by the U.S. Senate, the House, and the president?

* Which government-granted privileges and special protections has government enacted for the benefit of pharmaceutical corporations, hospitals, doctors, nurses, lawyers, or insurance companies that make medical care more expensive?

* Which of these privileges and special protections can your state legislature and governor repeal? Which need to be repealed by the U.S. Senate, the House, and the president?

100 Stimulus Projects Guaranteed To Make Your Blood Boil, is from June but I wanted to share it with you. The article comes from American Thinker and is just a fraction of what our tax dollars are paying for.

A California skate park will get a $620,000 “facelift.” Plans to refurbish the skate park in Long Beach, California, had stalled for months as local funds put towards higher priority park projects. With $620,000 in federal stimulus funding available to upgrade the skate park, the city council decided to move forward.

$800,000 for a backup runway for the now famous airport to nowhere, also known as the John Murtha airport in Johnstown. This is critical, because if they were to lose their current runway, all three flights a day and 20 daily passengers might have to find an alternative airport.

Last, but not least is Free Talk Live, a pro-liberty radio show that you can listen to on their website.

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